United can stop the bleeding, but it has to act fast

The Hill

Earlier this week, a video was released showing law enforcement (now infamously) removing a man from a United Airlines flight at the request of airline staff who, at the last minute, needed to free up four seats for crewmembers. Anyone familiar with the scene knows of the aftermath; a bloodied passenger being dragged off the plane as other concerned customers looked on. At best, industry professionals have called it a severe lapse in judgment on United’s part. Shock and anger seem to be the more popular sentiments among the general public.

The last thing most people see is an opportunity for United.

But that’s exactly what this is. Today’s fiasco can be tomorrow’s positive change. It starts with the public that could not only begin the process of repairing its damaged reputation but also could forge a brand stronger than it had been previously. with listening to customers. Should United choose to do so, it can create a dialogue with the public that could not only begin the process of repairing its damaged reputation but also could forge a brand stronger than it had been previously.